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2 Underestimated Twitter Features That Generate Website Traffic

Social Media Marketing October 19th, 2012

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Twitter has moved from being one of the largest and most well known social media networks of people to a tool for businesses to utilize in order to drive traffic to their website, increase brand awareness and ultimately increase sales. Unlike other social networking sites, Twitter relies mostly on 140 character releases of information to persuade public users to follow up with a different action; it is a chance for businesses to persuade potential customers to find answers they’re looking for through their company.

But unlike Facebook or Pinterest or Tumblr, Twitter does not offer visual features at first hit; there is no visual impact on potential consumers. With Twitter, there’s no chance to post a picture of your product for people to immediately recognize and decide they want it. Twitter is about using literary skills and its own in-built features to entice potential customers to find out more, to pursue your business.

This seems like a difficult task. It is a well-known fact that humans generally respond better to pictorial evidence; the old adage of ‘a picture speaks a thousand words’. However, Twitter has its own bonuses not offered with other social networks, which allow you, as a business owner, to participate in the humdrum of activity within the site and personally drive users to your site with your own words.

Related Posts:
Social Media: Relationships Now, ROI Later 

But how do you do this with merely 140 characters and a handful of links? It’s simple, just look at what Twitter is offering at your disposal.

Who Are Your Users?

One of the great features offered on Twitter is a ‘Who to Follow’ section. Using a series of algorithms that assess your keywords in your Tweets, your followers and who you’re already following, Twitter compounds a list of people useful for you to follow. To the average users without a business, this will comprise of people with the same interest as them or people who they may find entertaining to read about.

For you as a company, this is a whole different aspect of finding customers than you’re used to. Twitter is a series of exchanges, not a one way ‘like’ system like Facebook. Even though you’re a company, you’re expected to converse and interact with your potential buyers and therefore having a collection of profiles you follow can be helpful.

Firstly, by following people Twitter pairs you up with, the probability is, they’re the most likely people to have some interest in what your business has to offer. They may have previously ‘hashtagged’ about similar subjects, have a description that shows your industry as an interest, or share similar followers to you. For example, if you have great Genesis WordPress Themes and Twitter users are struggling with WordPress, you should be jumping on this opportunity to shine. These people should be seen as potential customers and following them raises their awareness of you and is likely to persuade them to visit your website out of curiosity.

Additionally, Twitter may often present you with potential followers who work in the same industry to you or in an adjacent field. These people can be useful as contacts to converse with about topical subjects and also as businesses to monitor. By following these people you can see what they’re talking about within your industry field, see which tactics they’re using to generate followers and what they’re offering as a business. These people are not ones to drive to your website, but more a tool to utilize in order to derive tactics for driving users to your website.

A Direct Hello

One of the key marketing techniques pointed out by the School of Internet Marketing, is that direct messaging on Twitter, despite being a harder feature to manage than Facebook’s direct message as both parties have to be following one another to utilize this tool, is infinitely useful. By @tagging someone in order to ask them to follow you so you can send a direct message to them ignites people’s curiosity and is generally pretty effective.

As a business you can use direct messaging as a more personal step to providing help for potential customers which shows them you’re trustworthy as a brand and helpful as a company. One of the best ways to utilize this system is to build rapport first and move through these steps:

  • 1. Find a potential customer interested in a relevant field to yours through monitoring your keywords and seeing who is hashtagging your keywords.
  • 2. If any users are asking questions related to your field that you know about, answer them using the @tagging system, in order to give a direct and personal answer.
  • 3. If they reply to this, use that opportunity to ask if you can direct message them.
  • 4. Once they follow you, send a personal message giving a little more information on the subject, perhaps a link, and provide personal contact details that they can reach you on for further assistance or information.

Following these steps shows you as a cooperative and accommodating retailer and shows your business in a great light. These days, people value community highly and see one to one help as a commodity not often offered. Most users will be extremely grateful for this help, and likely to visit your website and recommend your brand to others.

Post By Emily Jenkins (1 Posts)

Emily Jenkins is a freelance writer from the UK. Despite her being new to writing, she has quickly managed to build a strong online men’s fashion magazine. She even has learnt how to display her writing on personal blogs with the help of www.shopwpthemes.com, who taught her a lot about choosing the best WordPress Themes. Taking that helping hand, and now extremely clued up on social media marketing, she spends her time helping others to get their start-up online businesses up to scratch using step by step guides and handy tips.

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Emily Jenkins is a freelance writer from the UK. Despite her being new to writing, she has quickly managed to build a strong online men’s fashion magazine. She even has learnt how to display her writing on personal blogs with the help of www.shopwpthemes.com, who taught her a lot about choosing the best WordPress Themes. Taking that helping hand, and now extremely clued up on social media marketing, she spends her time helping others to get their start-up online businesses up to scratch using step by step guides and handy tips.

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2 Underestimated Twitter Features That Generate Website Traffic

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